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dc.contributor.authorCooper, Frederick
dc.contributor.editorRömer, Franz
dc.contributor.editorWeigelin-Schwiedrzik, Susanne
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-21T04:04:40Z
dc.date.available2022-05-21T04:04:40Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2022-05-20T05:30:49Z
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/54623
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/81821
dc.description.abstractThe history of decolonization is usually written backward, as if the end-point (a world of juridically equivalent nation-states) was known from the start. But the routes out of colonial empire appear more varied. Some Africans sought equal rights within empire, others to federate among themselves; some sought independence. In London or Paris, officials realized they had to reform colonial empires, but not necessarily give them up. The idea of “development” became a way to assert that empires could be made both more productive and more legitimate. Frederick Cooper explores how these alternative possibilities narrowed between 1945 and approximately 1960.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HB History::HBT History: specific events & topics::HBTQ Colonialism & imperialism
dc.subject.otherPolitical Science
dc.subject.otherColonialism & Post-colonialism
dc.titleOut of Empire
dc.title.alternativeRedefining Africa’s Place in the World (Volume 8)
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.14220/9783737300970
oapen.relation.isPublishedByace526f3-9199-4ab6-a778-c496d272ac85
oapen.relation.isFundedBy969f21b5-ac00-4517-9de2-44973eec6874
oapen.collectionKnowledge Unlatched (KU)
oapen.imprintV&R unipress
dc.number6408
dc.relationisFundedByb818ba9d-2dd9-4fd7-a364-7f305aef7ee9


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