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dc.contributor.authorLaurent, Brice
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-29T14:13:52Z
dc.date.available2022-04-29T14:13:52Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifierONIX_20220429_9780262368575_4
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/80922
dc.description.abstractHow interventions based on objects—including chemicals, financial products, and consumer goods—offer a path to rethink European integration. Interventions based on objects, Brice Laurent claims, have become a dominant path for European policy-making. In European Objects, Laurent analyzes the political consequences of these interventions and their democratization. He uses the term “European objects” to describe technical entities that are regulated—and thereby transformed—by European policies. To uncover the bureaucratic and regulatory intricacies of European governance, Laurent focuses on a series of these objects, including food products, chemicals, financial products, consumer goods, drinking water, and occupational environments. Laurent argues that taking European objects seriously offers a way to rephrase the dreams of harmonization and, eventually, rethink the constitutional strength of European integration. Laurent doesn't just clarify how European regulation works, but also explores ways to realize long-term objectives for European integration, such as a harmonized market or an objective expertise. Regulation is best understood as “regulatory machinery” bringing together various types of legal constraints, material interventions on objects, and the imagining of desirable futures. Analyzing European objects enables Laurent to explore what regulation has become after years of evolution have made it a central component of the European policy world. He offers practical illustrations of how the regulatory machinery functions today. If Europe succeeds at reinventing the terms of its legitimacy with objects that matter for the European publics, it will provide a telling demonstration that the opposition of expertise and populism is not the unavoidable fate of liberal democracies.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInside Technology
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JH Sociology and anthropology::JHB Sociologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JB Society and culture: general::JBF Social and ethical issues::JBFW Sex and sexuality, social aspectsen_US
dc.subject.otherPolitics and government
dc.subject.otherSociology
dc.titleEuropean Objects
dc.title.alternativeThe Troubled Dreams of Harmonization
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.7551/mitpress/13781.001.0001
oapen.relation.isPublishedByae0cf962-f685-4933-93d1-916defa5123d
oapen.relation.isbn9780262368575
oapen.relation.isbn9780262543330
oapen.imprintThe MIT Press
oapen.pages280
oapen.place.publicationCambridge


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