Show simple item record

dc.contributor.editorYasutomi, Atsushi
dc.contributor.editorArcala Hall, Rosalie
dc.contributor.editorKiba, Saya
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-24T04:02:49Z
dc.date.available2022-03-24T04:02:49Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.date.submitted2022-03-23T09:56:23Z
dc.identifierONIX_20220323_9781000545944_29
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/53574
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/79733
dc.description.abstractAn exploration of the roles that pro- and anti-government militias, private armed groups, vigilantes, and gangs play in local communities in the new democracies of Southeast Asia. Scholars have typically characterized irregular forces as spoilers and infiltrators in post-conflict peacebuilding processes. The contributors to this book challenge this conventional understanding of irregular forces in Southeast Asia, demonstrating that they often attract solid support from civilians and can be major contributors to the building of local security — a process by which local residents, in the absence of an effective police force, develop, partner or are at least included in the management of community crimes and other violence. They analyze irregular forces’ dealings with political actors at the community level, explaining why and how forces are incorporated in and collaborate with legitimate institutions without using violence against them. Offering a new approach to dealing with irregular forces in Southeast Asia, contributors explore new theoretical frameworks that are better suited for evaluating irregular forces’ relationship to different security providers and the political environments in the region. Specifically, they examine case studies from Indonesia, Timor-Leste, the Philippines, and Thailand. A valuable resource for researchers, students and practitioners in the areas of conflict resolution, peacebuilding, and security governance, especially those with a focus on Southeast Asia. This book will also be of great interest to scholars of the sociology and anthropology of the region.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRoutledge Contemporary Southeast Asia Series
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JP Politics and government::JPV Political control and freedomsen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JH Sociology and anthropology::JHB Sociologyen_US
dc.subject.otherGuerilla
dc.subject.otherIndonesia
dc.subject.otherKinship
dc.subject.otherMilitia
dc.subject.otherPeacebuilding
dc.subject.otherPeacekeeping
dc.subject.otherPhilippines
dc.subject.otherSecurity
dc.subject.otherTerrorist
dc.subject.otherThailand
dc.subject.otherTimor L’Este
dc.subject.otherTribe
dc.titlePathways for Irregular Forces in Southeast Asia
dc.title.alternativeMitigating Violence with Non-State Armed Groups
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.4324/9781003143994
oapen.relation.isPublishedByfa69b019-f4ee-4979-8d42-c6b6c476b5f0
oapen.relation.isbn9781000545944
oapen.relation.isbn9781003143994
oapen.relation.isbn9780367699574
oapen.relation.isbn9780367699581
oapen.imprintRoutledge
oapen.pages212
oapen.review.commentsTaylor & Francis open access titles are reviewed as a minimum at proposal stage by at least two external peer reviewers and an internal editor (additional reviews may be sought and additional content reviewed as required).
oapen.peerreviewProposal review
peerreview.review.typeProposal
peerreview.anonymitySingle-anonymised
peerreview.reviewer.typeInternal editor
peerreview.reviewer.typeExternal peer reviewer
peerreview.review.stagePre-publication
peerreview.open.reviewNo
peerreview.publish.responsibilityPublisher
peerreview.idbc80075c-96cc-4740-a9f3-a234bc2598f1
peerreview.titleProposal review


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

open access
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as open access