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dc.contributor.editorNeumann, Kiersten
dc.contributor.editorThomason, Allison
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-05T04:00:55Z
dc.date.available2022-02-05T04:00:55Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.date.submitted2022-02-04T10:22:08Z
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/52666
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/78116
dc.description.abstractThis chapter surveys and analyses the aromatic substances associated with burial and the preservation of the dead in the Iron Age Phoenician Levant (c. 1100–300 BCE), as part of an exploration of the lost smellscapes of the ancient world. First, Phoenician vocabulary related to smelling and pungent substances is outlined and investigated. Then, a review of coastal Levantine archaeological and textual evidence, along with comparanda from the wider Mediterranean world, is used to establish the range of smells and substances that would have been associated with mortuary practice at this time. While oleo-resins in use in the burial record overlap to some degree with those used in everyday life—in perfumes, religious practice, and other uses of scented oils and incense—the unique constellations of aromatics used to inter the dead highlight the importance of these deeply mnemonic sensory elements in our understanding of the Iron Age past.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::N History and Archaeology::NH History::NHC Ancient historyen_US
dc.subject.othersenses in the near east, senses in the ane, sensory experience in the near east, senses in mesopotamia, sensory studies in the near east, sensory studies and ancient urbanism, dress and the senses in the near east, the body and sensory studies in the near east, sensory studies and ancient dress, sensory studies and the ancient body, ritual and the senses in the near east, death and sensory studies in the near east, ritual and sensory studies in the near east, ritual and the senses in antiquity, death and the senses in antiquity, emotions and cognition in the near east, sensory studies and cognition, sensory studies and language in the near east, sound in the near east
dc.titleThe Routledge Handbook of the Senses in the Ancient Near East
dc.typebook
oapen.relation.isPublishedByfa69b019-f4ee-4979-8d42-c6b6c476b5f0
oapen.relation.hasChapterChapter 20 The smells of eternity
oapen.relation.hasChapterChapter 26 Language technology approach to “seeing” in Akkadian
oapen.relation.isbn9780367235284
oapen.relation.isbn9781032065663
oapen.relation.isbn9780429280207
oapen.imprintRoutledge
oapen.peerreviewProposal review
peerreview.review.typeProposal
peerreview.anonymitySingle-anonymised
peerreview.reviewer.typeInternal editor
peerreview.reviewer.typeExternal peer reviewer
peerreview.review.stagePre-publication
peerreview.open.reviewNo
peerreview.publish.responsibilityPublisher
peerreview.idbc80075c-96cc-4740-a9f3-a234bc2598f1
peerreview.titleProposal review


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Chapters in this book

  • Dixon, Helen (2022)
    This chapter surveys and analyses the aromatic substances associated with burial and the preservation of the dead in the Iron Age Phoenician Levant (c. 1100–300 BCE), as part of an exploration of the lost smellscapes of ...
  • Sahala, Aleksi; Svärd, Saana (2022)
    One of the ways meanings of words can be understood is based on their distributional properties. Such methodology offers an interesting quantitative viewpoint on the study of the lexicography of long-extinct languages. ...