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dc.contributor.editorLähteenmäki, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-28T02:11:18Z
dc.date.available2021-05-28T02:11:18Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.submitted2021-05-27T09:28:23Z
dc.identifierONIX_20210527_9789518583953_27
dc.identifier0355-1768
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/48830
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/70106
dc.description.abstractFor the first time worldwide, this collection brings together analyses of the last two centuries of historical change around the shores and drainage basin of Lake Ladoga, Europe’s largest lake. The main focus of the narrative is the Northern Ladoga region, which was a Finnish administrative area between 1812 and 1944. After the Second World War, the entire shoreline of Lake Ladoga was incorporated into the northeast part of Russia’s border region, the Autonomous Republic of Karelia and the Leningrad Province. The main theme uniting this collection is how the relationship between humans and nature is shaped by industrialization and modernization in society. Other key issues include protecting nature and perspectives on particular places and times, which are reflected in the methodological and thematic choices made in this volume. The research framework set by the editor, Professor Maria Lähteenmäki, is the new lakefront history (Finn. uusi rantahistoria), focusing on approaches to environmental, economic and sensory history of lakes. To draw broad conclusions, on the one hand, the multilevel changes on the lakefront cannot be understood without knowledge of the history of the wider drainage basin, and awareness of the geopolitics of the region and the climate changes. On the other hand, the human relationship to natural waters has changed significantly in 200 years. Thinking in terms of economic benefit has gradually given way to principles of sustainable development. Lake Ladoga is also being redefined from a spatial perspective, as nationalist ownership of the region is coupled with global concern about the state of Europe’s largest lake.
dc.languageFinnish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSuomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seuran Toimituksia
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JB Society and culture: general::JBC Cultural and media studies::JBCC Cultural studiesen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::M Medicine and Nursing::MB Medicine: general issues::MBN Public health and preventive medicine::MBNH Personal and public health / health education::MBNH2 Environmental factorsen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::R Earth Sciences, Geography, Environment, Planning::RG Geographyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::N History and Archaeology::NH Historyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JH Sociology and anthropology::JHB Sociologyen_US
dc.subject.otherSoviet Union/Russia
dc.subject.otherconservation history
dc.subject.otherindustrialization
dc.subject.othernature-human relationship
dc.subject.otherlakefront history
dc.subject.otherLake Ladoga
dc.titleLaatokka
dc.title.alternativeSuurjärven kiehtova rantahistoria
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.21435/skst.1469
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy8ceefe60-b6e9-4502-8498-ff110bb0f062
oapen.relation.isbn9789518583953
oapen.relation.isbn9789518583977
oapen.relation.isbn9789518583960
oapen.pages315
oapen.place.publicationHelsinki
dc.seriesnumber8
dc.abstractotherlanguageFor the first time worldwide, this collection brings together analyses of the last two centuries of historical change around the shores and drainage basin of Lake Ladoga, Europe’s largest lake. The main focus of the narrative is the Northern Ladoga region, which was a Finnish administrative area between 1812 and 1944. After the Second World War, the entire shoreline of Lake Ladoga was incorporated into the northeast part of Russia’s border region, the Autonomous Republic of Karelia and the Leningrad Province. The main theme uniting this collection is how the relationship between humans and nature is shaped by industrialization and modernization in society. Other key issues include protecting nature and perspectives on particular places and times, which are reflected in the methodological and thematic choices made in this volume. The research framework set by the editor, Professor Maria Lähteenmäki, is the new lakefront history (Finn. uusi rantahistoria), focusing on approaches to environmental, economic and sensory history of lakes. To draw broad conclusions, on the one hand, the multilevel changes on the lakefront cannot be understood without knowledge of the history of the wider drainage basin, and awareness of the geopolitics of the region and the climate changes. On the other hand, the human relationship to natural waters has changed significantly in 200 years. Thinking in terms of economic benefit has gradually given way to principles of sustainable development. Lake Ladoga is also being redefined from a spatial perspective, as nationalist ownership of the region is coupled with global concern about the state of Europe’s largest lake.


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