Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSayer, Duncan
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T08:42:02Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T08:42:02Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.submitted2021-02-12T11:43:55Z
dc.identifierONIX_20210212_9781526153845_6
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/46719
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/63603
dc.description.abstractEarly Anglo-Saxon cemeteries are well-known because of their rich grave goods, but this wealth can obscure their importance as local phenomena and the product of pluralistic multi-generational communities. This book explores over one hundred early Anglo-Saxon and some Merovingian cemeteries and aims to understand them using a multi-dimensional methodology. The performance of mortuary drama was a physical communication and so needed syntax and semantics. This local knowledge was used to negotiate the arrangement of cemetery spaces and to construct the stories that were told within them. For some families the emphasis of a mortuary ritual was on reinforcing and reproducing family narratives, but this was only one technique used to arrange cemetery space. This book offers an alternative way to explore the horizontal organisation of cemeteries from a holistic perspective. Each chapter builds on the last, using visual aesthetics, leitmotifs, spatial statistics, grave orientation, density of burial, mortuary ritual, grave goods, grave robbing, barrows, integral structures, skeletal trauma, stature, gender and age to build a detailed picture of complex mortuary spaces. This approach places community at the forefront of interpretation because people used and reused cemetery spaces and these people chose to emphasise different characteristics of the deceased because of their own attitudes, lifeways and lived experiences. This book will appeal to scholars of Anglo-Saxon studies and will also be of value to archaeologists interested in mortuary spaces, communities and social differentiation because it proposes a way to move beyond grave goods in the discussion of complex social identities.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::N History and Archaeology::NK Archaeology::NKD Archaeology by period / regionen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::1 Place qualifiers::1D Europeen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::3 Time period qualifiers::3K CE period up to c 1500::3KL c 1000 CE to c 1500en_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JH Sociology and anthropology::JHB Sociology::JHBZ Sociology: death and dyingen_US
dc.subject.otherMortuary archaeology
dc.subject.otherCommunity
dc.subject.otherKinship
dc.subject.otherEarly Anglo-Saxon
dc.subject.otherMerovingian
dc.subject.otherSocial archaeology
dc.subject.otherBurial
dc.subject.otherCemetery organisation
dc.subject.otherSocial identity
dc.subject.otherSpatial archaeology
dc.titleEarly Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
dc.title.alternativeKinship, community and identity
dc.typebook
oapen.relation.isPublishedBybcb4ab08-c525-4e6c-88e5-a0cf0a175533
oapen.relation.isFundedBy305e44ef-0380-47c5-8a01-d829a516196c
oapen.relation.isFundedBy92cd3990-ff5b-4246-bf60-ec1dd130a122
oapen.pages336
oapen.place.publicationManchester
oapen.grant.number[grantnumber unknown]
dc.relationisFundedBy92cd3990-ff5b-4246-bf60-ec1dd130a122


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

open access
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as open access