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dc.contributor.authorBohle, Leah Franziska,
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T12:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2016-12-31 23:55:55
dc.date.submitted2019-11-28 11:41:33
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:14:37Z
dc.identifier610259
dc.identifierOCN: 1030817448
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/37279
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/39348
dc.description.abstract“She was given her own plate, her own cup, everything of her own, even when she just touched a cloth then nobody wanted to touch it again.” (Halima, HIV-seropositive) The book sheds light on the profound influence of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis on the lives of women and their social environment in the United Republic of Tanzania. The author, a medical doctor and social anthropologist, tells the story of six Tanzanian HIV-seropositive women, focusing on their negotiation and perception of illness and disease. Furthermore, the high levels of discrimination and stigmatization in the context of HIV-seropositivity that they experience are presented in detail, weaving together the impacts of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis with results analyzed both from a Medical Anthropology and Public Health perspective. Despite a new era of antiretroviral treatment, available in Tanzania free of cost, that has given cause for hope in a change in how the disease is perceived, the book impressively underlines that being HIV-seropositive remains a great challenge and heavy burden for women in Tanzania.
dc.description.abstract“She was given her own plate, her own cup, everything of her own, even when she just touched a cloth then nobody wanted to touch it again.” (Halima, HIV-seropositive) The book sheds light on the profound influence of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis on the lives of women and their social environment in the United Republic of Tanzania. The author, a medical doctor and social anthropologist, tells the story of six Tanzanian HIV-seropositive women, focusing on their negotiation and perception of illness and disease. Furthermore, the high levels of discrimination and stigmatization in the context of HIV-seropositivity that they experience are presented in detail, weaving together the impacts of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis with results analyzed both from a Medical Anthropology and Public Health perspective. Despite a new era of antiretroviral treatment, available in Tanzania free of cost, that has given cause for hope in a change in how the disease is perceived, the book impressively underlines that being HIV-seropositive remains a great challenge and heavy burden for women in Tanzania.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine::MB Medicine: general issues::MBN Public health & preventive medicine::MBNH Personal & public health
dc.subject.otherHIV
dc.subject.otherWomen
dc.subject.otherTanzania
dc.subject.otherSocial Environment
dc.subject.otherPublic Health
dc.subject.otherDiscrimination
dc.subject.otherHIV/AIDS
dc.subject.otherInfection
dc.subject.otherMedical anthropology
dc.subject.otherSerostatus
dc.subject.otherTanga
dc.subject.otherTanzania
dc.titleStigmatization, discrimination and illness
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.17875/gup2013-289
oapen.relation.isPublishedByaf9011e0-03b9-4a5c-9ae6-b9da4898d1b2
oapen.relation.isbn9783863951085
dc.abstractotherlanguage“She was given her own plate, her own cup, everything of her own, even when she just touched a cloth then nobody wanted to touch it again.” (Halima, HIV-seropositive) The book sheds light on the profound influence of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis on the lives of women and their social environment in the United Republic of Tanzania. The author, a medical doctor and social anthropologist, tells the story of six Tanzanian HIV-seropositive women, focusing on their negotiation and perception of illness and disease. Furthermore, the high levels of discrimination and stigmatization in the context of HIV-seropositivity that they experience are presented in detail, weaving together the impacts of an HIV-seropositive diagnosis with results analyzed both from a Medical Anthropology and Public Health perspective. Despite a new era of antiretroviral treatment, available in Tanzania free of cost, that has given cause for hope in a change in how the disease is perceived, the book impressively underlines that being HIV-seropositive remains a great challenge and heavy burden for women in Tanzania.


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