Export citation

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorM. Stang, Charles
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2013-12-31 23:55:55
dc.date.submitted2018-10-03 09:09:28
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:58:35Z
dc.identifier453480
dc.identifierOCN: 1030815291
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/33853
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/36366
dc.description.abstractThis book argues that the pseudonym, Dionysius the Areopagite, and the influence of Paul together constitute the best interpretive lens for understanding the Corpus Dionysiacum [CD]. This book demonstrates how Paul in fact animates the entire corpus, that the influence of Paul illuminates such central themes of the CD as hierarchy, theurgy, deification, Christology, affirmation (kataphasis) and negation (apophasis), dissimilar similarities, and unknowing. Most importantly, Paul serves as a fulcrum for the expression of a new theological anthropology, an “apophatic anthropology.” Dionysius figures Paul as the premier apostolic witness to this apophatic anthropology, as the ecstatic lover of the divine who confesses to the rupture of his self and the indwelling of the divine in Gal 2:20: “it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me.” Building on this notion of apophatic anthropology, the book forwards an explanation for why this sixth‐century author chose to write under an apostolic pseudonym. It argues that the very practice of pseudonymous writing itself serves as an ecstatic devotional exercise whereby the writer becomes split in two and thereby open to the indwelling of the divine. Pseudonymity is on this interpretation integral and internal to the aims of the wider mystical enterprise. Thus this book aims to question the distinction between “theory” and “practice” by demonstrating that negative theology—often figured as a speculative and rarefied theory regarding the transcendence of God—is in fact best understood as a kind of asceticism, a devotional practice aiming for the total transformation of the Christian subject.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTHE OXFORD EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRC Christianity::HRCC Christian Churches & denominations::HRCC1 The Early Church
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRC Christianity::HRCM Christian theology
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRC Christianity::HRCS Christian spirituality & religious experience::HRCS1 Christian mysticism
dc.subject.otherpseudo-dionysius
dc.subject.otherdionysius the areopagite
dc.subject.otherst. paul
dc.subject.otherapophasis
dc.subject.othermysticism
dc.subject.othercorpus dionysiacum
dc.subject.otherpseudonymity
dc.subject.othernegative theology
dc.subject.otherapophatic anthropology
dc.subject.otherCreative Commons
dc.subject.otherGod
dc.subject.otherJesus
dc.subject.otherLate antiquity
dc.subject.otherNeoplatonism
dc.subject.otherPaul the Apostle
dc.subject.otherTheurgy
dc.titleApophasis and Pseudonymity in Dionysius the Areopagite
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199640423.001.0001
oapen.relation.isPublishedBydb4e319f-ca9f-449a-bcf2-37d7c6f885b1
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameOxford University Press
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitehttp://ukcatalogue.oup.com
oapen.relation.isFundedByOAPEN-UK
oapen.collectionOAPEN-UK
oapen.pages245
dc.relationisFundedBy780772a6-efb4-48c3-b268-5edaad8380c4


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

open access
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as open access