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dc.contributor.authorCalder, David
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019-12-03 08:32:13
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T10:14:22Z
dc.identifier1005176
dc.identifierOCN: 1126206415
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/24930
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/32570
dc.description.abstractStreet theatre and the production of postindustrial space explores how street theatre transforms industrial space into postindustrial space. Deindustrializing communities have increasingly turned to cultural projects to commemorate industrial heritage while simultaneously generating surplus value and jobs in a changing economy. Through analysis of French street theatre companies working out of converted industrial sites, this book reveals how theatre and performance more generally participate in and make historical sense of ongoing urban and economic change. The book argues, firstly, that deindustrialization and redevelopment rely on the spatial and temporal logics of theatre and performance. Redevelopment requires theatrical events and performative acts that revise, resituate, and re-embody particular pasts. The book proposes working memory as a central metaphor for these processes. The book argues, secondly, that in contemporary France street theatre has emerged as working memory's privileged artistic form. If the transition from industrial to postindustrial space relies on theatrical logics, those logics will manifest differently depending on geographic context. The book links the proliferation of street theatre in France since the 1970s to the crisis in Fordist-Taylorist modernity. How have street theatre companies converted spaces of manufacturing into spaces of theatrical production? How do these companies (with municipal governments and developers) connect their work to the work that occurred in these spaces in the past? How do those connections manifest in theatrical events, and how do such events give shape and meaning to redevelopment? Street theatre’s function is both economic and historiographic. It makes the past intelligible as past and useful to the present.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::A The arts::AN Theatre studies
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::A The arts::AN Theatre studies::ANF Theatre direction & production
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::A The arts::AS Dance & other performing arts::ASZ Other performing arts::ASZD Street theatre
dc.subject.otherstreet theatre
dc.subject.otherpostindustrial space
dc.subject.otherdeindustrialization
dc.subject.otherredevelopment
dc.subject.otherworking memory
dc.subject.othertheatricality
dc.subject.otherperformativity
dc.subject.othertheatre historiography
dc.titleStreet theatre and the production of postindustrial space
dc.title.alternativeWorking memories
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.7765/9781526147288
oapen.relation.isPublishedBybcb4ab08-c525-4e6c-88e5-a0cf0a175533
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameManchester University Press
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitehttp://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/
oapen.relation.isFundedByUniversity of Manchester
virtual.oapen_relation_isFundedBy.grantor_nameUniversity of Manchester
oapen.pages216
oapen.place.publicationManchester, UK
dc.relationisFundedBya897f645-c917-4be8-a0db-e8b3f64cac47


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