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dc.contributor.authorMcKeown, John
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T12:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2018-04-03 00:00:00
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T12:52:21Z
dc.identifier646653
dc.identifierOCN: 899280623
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/30346
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/32173
dc.description.abstractThe human population's annual total consumption is not sustainable by one planet. This unprecedented situation calls for a reformation in religious cultures that promote a large ideal family size. Many observers assume that Christianity is inevitably part of this problem because it promotes "family values" and statistically, in America and elsewhere, has a higher birthrate than nonreligious people. This book explores diverse ideas about human reproduction in the church past and present. It investigates an extreme fringe of U.S. Protestantism, including the Quiverfull movement, that use Old Testament "fruitful" verses to support natalist ideas explicitly promoting higher fecundity. It also challenges the claim by some natalists that Martin Luther in the 16th century advocated similar ideas. This book argues that natalism is inappropriate as a Christian application of Scripture, especially since rich populations’ total footprints are detrimental to biodiversity and to human welfare. It explores the ancient cultural context of the Bible verses quoted by natalists. Challenging the assumption that religion normally promotes fecundity, the book finds surprising exceptions among early Christians (with a special focus on Saint Augustine) since they advocated spiritual fecundity in preference to biological fecundity. Finally the book uses a hermeneutic lens derived from Genesis 1, and prioritising the modern problem of biodiversity, to provide ecological interpretations of the Bible's "fruitful" verses.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRA Religion: general::HRAM Religious issues & debates
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::R Earth sciences, geography, environment, planning::RN The environment::RNA Environmentalist thought & ideology
dc.subject.otherfecundity
dc.subject.otherecology
dc.subject.otherbiodiversity
dc.subject.otherfamily
dc.subject.otherbible
dc.subject.otherchristianlity
dc.subject.othernatalism
dc.subject.otherAugustine of Hippo
dc.subject.otherGod
dc.subject.otherOld Testament
dc.subject.otherUnited States
dc.titleGod's Babies
dc.title.alternativeNatalism and Bible Interpretation in Modern America
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.11647/OBP.0048
oapen.relation.isPublishedByb014b543-78bd-4c3b-bc71-b68e2ac855b9
oapen.collectionScholarLed
oapen.pages260


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