Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMunro, Donald J.
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.submitted2020-09-03T13:54:29Z
dc.identifierONIX_20200903_9780472901784_7
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/41562
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/30167
dc.description.abstractHow have traditional Chinese ways of thinking affected problem solving in this century? The traditional, imperial style of inquiry is associated with the belief that the universe is a coherent, internally structured unity understandable through the similarly structured human mind. It involves a reliance on antecedent and authoritarian models, coupled with an introspective focus in investigations, at some cost to objective fact gathering. In contrast, emergent forms of inquiry are guided by the values of individual autonomy and new perspectives on objectivity. In the 1930s and 1940s, some liberal educators held the model of Western science in great esteem, and some scientists practicing objective inquiry helped to create an awareness in the urban areas of inquiry not directed by political values. Drawing on philosophical, social science, and popular culture materials, Donald Munro shows that the two strains coexisted in twentieth century China as mixed motives. Many important figures were motivated by a desire to act consistently with the social values associated with the premodern or received view of knowledge and inquiry. At the same time, these people often had other motives, such as utilitarian values, efficiency, and entrepreneurship. Munro argues that while many competing positions can coexist in the same person, the seeds of the positive, instrumental value of individual autonomy in Chinese inquiry are beginning to compete in both scholarly and popular culture with other, older approaches.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMichigan Monographs In Chinese Studies
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.otherSociety and social sciences
dc.subject.otherVeterinary medicine: infectious diseases and therapeutics
dc.subject.otherMedical anthropology
dc.titleThe Imperial Style of Inquiry in Twentieth-Century China
dc.title.alternativeThe Emergence of New Approaches
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.3998/mpub.19105
oapen.relation.isPublishedByb7359529-e5f7-4510-a59f-d7dafa1d4d17
oapen.relation.isFundedBydcf50849-b837-420d-ac46-64995a7bf0d4
oapen.relation.isFundedBy0314e571-4102-4526-b014-3ed8f2d6750a
oapen.imprintU OF M CENTER FOR CHINESE STUDIES
oapen.pages159
oapen.grant.number[grantnumber unknown]
oapen.review.commentsThe proposal was selected by the acquisitions editor who invited a full manuscript. The full manuscript was reviewed by two external readers using a double-blind process. Based on the acquisitions editor recommendation, the external reviews, and their own analysis, the Executive Committee (Editorial Board) of U-M Press approved the project for publication.en_US
peerreview.review.decisionYes
peerreview.review.typeFull text
peerreview.anonymityDouble-blind
peerreview.reviewer.typeExternal peer reviewer
peerreview.review.stagePre-publication
peerreview.open.reviewNo
peerreview.publish.responsibilityScientific or Editorial Board
peerreview.idd98bf225-990a-4ac4-acf4-fd7bf0dfb00c
dc.relationisFundedBy0314e571-4102-4526-b014-3ed8f2d6750a
dc.seriesnumber72


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

open access
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as open access