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dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Dirk
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T12:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.date.submitted2018-07-01 23:55
dc.date.submitted2020-03-18 13:36:15
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T12:37:19Z
dc.identifier1000195
dc.identifierOCN: 1051780114
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/29753
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/29104
dc.description.abstractA lot of qualitative researchers have a healthy wariness about straightforward categorisation and modelling endeavours undertaken by quantitative researchers. Too often, variables and measurements are too rigid in quantitative analysis to take stock of all the complexity and context-dependency of human behaviour, attitudes and identities. In the worst-case scenario for migration studies, this leads to oversimplification, essentialisation and culturalism. In line with King et al. (1994), I would, however, in this chapter, like to plead for qualitative researchers to take into account that, in terms of challenges of validity and reliability, we have a lot to learn from each other. Acknowledging that qualitative research has its distinctive advantages (Brady and Collier 2004), I will argue that choices in categorisation, case selection and research design are of crucial importance, perhaps even more in qualitative studies than in quantitative studies, even if in both methodological traditions we are confronted with similar challenges. Being transparent and reflecting on the consequences of our choices of categorisation, analysis and interpretation is of crucial importance. It is too easy to think that qualitative research would, by definition, be better equipped in doing justice to the phenomena we wish to study in the field of migration, especially if our research focusses on migrants.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JB Society and culture: general::JBF Social and ethical issues::JBFH Migration, immigration and emigrationen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::5 Interest qualifiers::5P Relating to specific groups and cultures or social and cultural interests::5PB Relating to peoples: ethnic groups, indigenous peoples, cultures and other groupings of people::5PBC Relating to migrant groups / diaspora communities or peoplesen_US
dc.subject.otherCategorisation
dc.subject.otherEthnic minorities
dc.subject.otherMigration Methodology
dc.subject.otherComparison
dc.subject.otherValidity
dc.subject.otherReliability
dc.subject.otherControl-group
dc.subject.otherBrussels
dc.subject.otherDemography
dc.subject.otherDependent and independent variables
dc.subject.otherEuropean Union
dc.subject.otherLabour economics
dc.subject.otherQualitative research
dc.subject.otherResearch design
dc.subject.otherSocial science
dc.subject.otherUnemployment
dc.titleChapter 8 Categorising What We Study and What We Analyse, and the Exercise of Interpretation
dc.typechapter
oapen.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-76861-8_8
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy9fa3421d-f917-4153-b9ab-fc337c396b5a
oapen.relation.isPartOfBookf68085c4-30e7-43c8-89fe-7319d0e946fa
oapen.relation.isFundedByfb214456-da48-4ff7-a1ee-f6407a27f6be
oapen.relation.isFundedBy7292b17b-f01a-4016-94d3-d7fb5ef9fb79
oapen.relation.isbn9783319768618
oapen.collectionEuropean Research Council (ERC)
oapen.pages17
oapen.place.publicationCham
oapen.grant.number283601
oapen.grant.programFP7
dc.relationisFundedBy7292b17b-f01a-4016-94d3-d7fb5ef9fb79


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