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dc.contributor.editorFabri, Hélène Ruiz
dc.contributor.editorErpelding, Michel
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-20T08:37:49Z
dc.date.available2023-04-20T08:37:49Z
dc.date.issued2023-04-14
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/99489
dc.description.abstractThe creation of 39 Mixed Arbitral Tribunals (‘MATs’) was a major contribution of the post-World War I peace treaties to the development of international adjudication. With over 90 000 claims handled, the MATs were the busiest international courts of the interwar period. Moreover, in a departure from most other international courts and tribunals at that time, they allowed individuals to file claims against sovereign states before them. After 1945, they inspired the creators of the European Court of Justice before disappearing into quasi-oblivion. Relying on legal and historical research, including new archival findings, this volume is specifically dedicated to these pioneering institutions.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStudies of the Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for International, European and Regulatory Procedural Lawen_US
dc.subject.classificationLAZen_US
dc.subject.otherFriedens- und Konfliktforschung, Friedensforschung, Friedenstheorie, Friedensverträge, Gemischte Schiedsgerichte, international courts, International Law, Internationale Gerichtsbarkeit, Internationales Recht, Legal History, MATs, Paris Peace Treaties, Rechtsgeschichte, Schiedsgerichte, Versailles, Neuilly Treaty, Trianon Treaty, Sèvres Treaty, Versailles Treaty, St-Germain Treaty, Lausanne Treatyen_US
dc.titleThe Mixed Arbitral Tribunals, 1919–1939en_US
dc.title.alternativeAn Experiment in the International Adjudication of Private Rightsen_US
dc.typebook
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
oapen.abstract.otherlanguageThe creation of 39 Mixed Arbitral Tribunals (‘MATs’) was a major contribution of the post-World War I peace treaties to the development of international adjudication. With over 90 000 claims handled, the MATs were the busiest international courts of the interwar period. Moreover, in a departure from most other international courts and tribunals at that time, they allowed individuals to file claims against sovereign states before them. After 1945, they inspired the creators of the European Court of Justice before disappearing into quasi-oblivion. Relying on legal and historical research, including new archival findings, this volume is specifically dedicated to these pioneering institutions.en_US
oapen.identifier.doi10.5771/9783748939719en_US
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy20c8b06d-3b2b-4af2-acda-fbcfdfea5744
oapen.relation.isbn978-3-7489-3971-9en_US
oapen.series.numberBand 25en_US
oapen.pages581en_US
oapen.place.publicationBaden-Badenen_US


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