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dc.contributor.authorPeng-Keller, Simon
dc.contributor.authorWiniger, Fabian
dc.contributor.authorRauch, Raphael
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-18T04:05:04Z
dc.date.available2022-11-18T04:05:04Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.date.submitted2022-11-17T09:08:00Z
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/59274
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/93874
dc.description.abstractSince the beginning of the World Health Organization, many of its staff members, regional offices, Member States, and directors-general have grappled with the question of what a ‘spiritual dimension’ of health looks like, and how it might enrich the health policies advocated by their organization. Contrary to the widespread perception that ‘spirituality’ is primarily related to palliative care and has emerged relatively recently within the WHO, this book shows that its history is considerably longer and more complex, and has been closely connected to the organization’s ethical aspirations, its quest for more holistic and equitable healthcare, and its struggle with the colonial legacy of international health organizations. Such ideals and struggles silently motivated many of its key actors and policies—such as the provision of universal primary healthcare—which for decades have embodied the organization’s loftiest aspirations. The WHO’s official relationship with ‘spirituality’ advanced in fits, leaps, and setbacks. At times creative and interdisciplinary, at others deeply political, this process was marked by cycles of institutional forgetting and remembering. Rather than a triumph of religious lobbyists, this book argues, the ‘spiritual dimension’ of health may be better understood as a ‘ghost’ that has haunted—and continues to haunt—the WHO as it comes to terms with its mandate of advancing health as a state of ‘complete well-being’ available to all.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRA Religion: general::HRAM Religious issues & debates::HRAM3 Religion & science
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRA Religion: general::HRAM Religious issues & debates::HRAM2 Religion & politics
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HR Religion & beliefs::HRA Religion: general::HRAX History of religion
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine::MB Medicine: general issues::MBX History of medicine
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::Q Philosophy and Religion::QR Religion and beliefs::QRA Religion: general::QRAM Religious issues and debates::QRAM3 Religion and scienceen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::Q Philosophy and Religion::QR Religion and beliefs::QRA Religion: general::QRAM Religious issues and debates::QRAM2 Religion and politicsen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::Q Philosophy and Religion::QR Religion and beliefs::QRA Religion: general::QRAX History of religionen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::M Medicine and Nursing::MB Medicine: general issues::MBX History of medicineen_US
dc.subject.otherreligion, spirituality, global health, World Health Organization, United Nations, primary healthcare, healthcare reform, social determinants of health
dc.titleThe Spirit of Global Health
dc.title.alternativeThe World Health Organization and the 'Spiritual Dimension' of Health, 1946-2021
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.1093/oso/9780192865502.001.0001
oapen.relation.isPublishedBydb4e319f-ca9f-449a-bcf2-37d7c6f885b1
oapen.collectionSwiss National Science Foundation (SNF)
oapen.pages265
oapen.place.publicationOxford
dc.relationisFundedBySchweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung


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