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dc.contributor.authorLawtoo, Nidesh
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-09T04:03:00Z
dc.date.available2022-11-09T04:03:00Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.date.submitted2022-11-08T12:56:46Z
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/59184
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/93494
dc.description.abstractGenealogy of one of the most ancient and influential concepts in western thought: Mimesis Imitation is, perhaps more than ever, constitutive of human originality. Many things have changed since the emergence of an original species called Homo sapiens, but in the digital age humans remain mimetic creatures: from the development of consciousness to education, aesthetics to politics, mirror neurons to brain plasticity, digital simulations to emotional contagion, (new) fascist insurrections to viral contagion, we are unconsciously formed, deformed, and transformed by the all too human tendency to imitate—for both good and ill. Crossing disciplines as diverse as philosophy, aesthetics, and politics, Homo Mimeticus proposes a new theory of one of the most influential concepts in western thought (mimesis) to confront some of the hypermimetic challenges of the present and future. Written in an accessible yet rigorous style, Homo Mimeticus appeals to both a specialized and general readership. It can be used in courses of modern and contemporary philosophy, aesthetics, political theory, literary criticism/theory, media studies, and new mimetic studies. Ebook available in Open Access. This publication is GPRC-labeled (Guaranteed Peer-Reviewed Content).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HP Philosophy
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HP Philosophy::HPN Philosophy: aesthetics
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HP Philosophy::HPS Social & political philosophy
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFD Media studies
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::Q Philosophy and Religion::QD Philosophyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::Q Philosophy and Religion::QD Philosophy::QDT Topics in philosophy::QDTN Philosophy: aestheticsen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::Q Philosophy and Religion::QD Philosophy::QDT Topics in philosophy::QDTS Social and political philosophyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JB Society and culture: general::JBC Cultural and media studies::JBCT Media studiesen_US
dc.subject.othermimetic studies;Mimesis;intersubjectivity;mimetic theory;contagion;simulation;crowd behaviour;identification
dc.titleHomo Mimeticus
dc.title.alternativeA New Theory of Imitation
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.11116/9789461664778
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy9e472607-bec3-4b15-ba3f-f05039722389
oapen.relation.isFundedBy6b1724e9-1f53-4f69-84a9-bca9c1d5dc78
oapen.relation.isFundedBy3f0a4da2-418f-411a-ae5f-8d27e0601aec
oapen.relation.isFundedBy178e65b9-dd53-4922-b85c-0aaa74fce079
oapen.relation.isFundedBy608fbdcb-bd0a-4d50-9a26-902224692f76
oapen.relation.isbn9789461664785
oapen.relation.isbn9789462703469
oapen.collectionEuropean Research Council (ERC)
oapen.pages358
oapen.place.publicationLeuven
oapen.grant.number716181
dc.relationisFundedBy178e65b9-dd53-4922-b85c-0aaa74fce079
dc.relationisFundedBy608fbdcb-bd0a-4d50-9a26-902224692f76
dc.grantprojectHOM


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