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dc.contributor.editorMarcetti, Corrado
dc.contributor.editorPecoriello, Anna Lisa
dc.contributor.editorSolimano, Nicola
dc.contributor.editorPaba, Giancarlo
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-02T04:30:23Z
dc.date.available2022-06-02T04:30:23Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2022-05-31T10:17:45Z
dc.identifierONIX_20220531_9788866550822_234
dc.identifier2704-579X
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/54950
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/83404
dc.description.abstractOver recent years, there has been a sharp increase in the various possible forms of poverty and housing vulnerability: from the total lack of shelter of the homeless to the risk of losing their home that now threatens numerous families in medium-low income brackets. At the same time, the traditional linear and standardised housing policies appear no longer adequate to address these phenomena. This book contains the results of a study entrusted by the Tuscan Regional Authority to a working group from the University of Florence and the Fondazione Giovanni Michelucci. The research explores the field of practices for self-production of housing in Italy and the world, through a critical selection of significant experiences, revealing the architectural and social creativity exploited in a large variety of collective actions. The book also contains a reconstruction of housing problems in Tuscany and an overview of alternative approaches to housing policy. The last section is devoted to the research-action on the occupation of the Luzzi, the abandoned sanatorium on the border between Florence and Sesto Fiorentino, a case that illustrates the most significant contradictions and dilemmas gravitating around the housing issue for the new poor: the problem of homeless immigrants; the difficulty of the authorities in managing problems of extreme housing poverty; the role of the associations and organisations of social mediation, and the inherent complexity of achieving a participatory approach to social and town planning research.
dc.languageItalian
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTerritori
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::R Earth sciences, geography, environment, planning::RP Regional & area planning::RPC Urban & municipal planning
dc.titleHousing Frontline
dc.title.alternativeInclusione sociale e processi di autocostruzione e autorecupero
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.36253/978-88-6655-082-2
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy2ec4474d-93b1-4cfa-b313-9c6019b51b1a
oapen.relation.isbn9788866550822
oapen.relation.isbn9788866550761
oapen.relation.isbn9788892736191
oapen.pages220
oapen.place.publicationFirenze
dc.seriesnumber9
dc.abstractotherlanguageOver recent years, there has been a sharp increase in the various possible forms of poverty and housing vulnerability: from the total lack of shelter of the homeless to the risk of losing their home that now threatens numerous families in medium-low income brackets. At the same time, the traditional linear and standardised housing policies appear no longer adequate to address these phenomena. This book contains the results of a study entrusted by the Tuscan Regional Authority to a working group from the University of Florence and the Fondazione Giovanni Michelucci. The research explores the field of practices for self-production of housing in Italy and the world, through a critical selection of significant experiences, revealing the architectural and social creativity exploited in a large variety of collective actions. The book also contains a reconstruction of housing problems in Tuscany and an overview of alternative approaches to housing policy. The last section is devoted to the research-action on the occupation of the Luzzi, the abandoned sanatorium on the border between Florence and Sesto Fiorentino, a case that illustrates the most significant contradictions and dilemmas gravitating around the housing issue for the new poor: the problem of homeless immigrants; the difficulty of the authorities in managing problems of extreme housing poverty; the role of the associations and organisations of social mediation, and the inherent complexity of achieving a participatory approach to social and town planning research.


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