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dc.contributor.authorMartelli, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorGiambona, Francesca
dc.contributor.authorKahlawi, Adham
dc.contributor.authorBuzzigoli, Lucia
dc.contributor.authorGrassini, Laura
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-02T04:14:30Z
dc.date.available2022-06-02T04:14:30Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.submitted2022-06-01T12:20:19Z
dc.identifierONIX_20220601_9788855184618_536
dc.identifier2704-5846
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/56351
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/82639
dc.description.abstractEconomists and social scientists are increasingly making use of web data to address socio-economic issues and to integrate existing sources of information. The data produced by online platforms and websites could produce a lot of useful and multidimensional information with a variety of potential applications in socio-economic analysis. In this respect, with the internet growth and knowledge, many aspects of job search have been transformed due to the availability of online tools for job searching, candidate searching and job matching. In European countries there is growing interest in designing and implementing real labour market information system applications for internet labour market data in order to support policy design and evaluation through evidence-based decision-making. The analysis of labour market web data could provide useful information for policy-makers to define labour market strategies as big data, jointly with official statistics, support policy makers in a pressing policy question namely “How to tackle the mismatch between jobs and skills?”. In this regard, the topic of skills gap, how to measure it and how to bridge it with education and continuous training have been tackled by using the big data collection, such as the Cedefop (European Center for the Development of Vocational Training) initiative and the Wollybi Project (made by Burning Glass). In this framework, this contribution focuses on the issues arising from the use (and the usefulness) of on-line job vacancy data to analyse the Italian labour market by using the Wollybi data available for the years 2019 and 2020. Furthermore, the availability of data for the year 2020, will allow us to evaluate whether there has been an impact of COVID19 in terms of needed skills and required occupations in the online job vacancies.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings e report
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.otherBig data
dc.subject.otherLabour market
dc.subject.otherBGT data
dc.titleChapter Big data analysis and labour market: an analysis of Italian online job vacancies data
dc.typechapter
oapen.identifier.doi10.36253/978-88-5518-461-8.22
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy2ec4474d-93b1-4cfa-b313-9c6019b51b1a
oapen.relation.isbn9788855184618
oapen.pages4
oapen.place.publicationFlorence
dc.seriesnumber132


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