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dc.contributor.authorCremin, Ciara
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-13T00:13:24Z
dc.date.available2022-05-13T00:13:24Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2022-04-23T05:31:21Z
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/54130
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/81511
dc.description.abstractFrom broadsheet newspapers to television shows and Hollywood films, capitalism is increasingly recognised as a system detrimental to human existence. Colin Cremin investigates why, despite this de-robing, capitalism remains a powerful and seductive force. Using materialist, psychoanalytic and linguistic approaches, Cremin shows how capitalism, anxiety and desire enter into a mutually supporting relationship. He identifies three ways in which we are tied in to capitalism – through a social imperative for enterprise and competition; through enjoyment and consumption; and through the depoliticisation of ethical debate by government and business. Capitalism's New Clothes is ideal for students of sociology and for anyone worried about the ethics of capitalism or embarrassed by the enjoyments the system has afforded them.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JH Sociology and anthropology::JHB Sociologyen_US
dc.subject.otherSocial Science
dc.subject.otherSociology
dc.titleCapitalism's New Clothes
dc.title.alternativeEnterprise, Ethics and Enjoyment in Times of Crisis
dc.typebook
oapen.relation.isPublishedBycdf55516-7e48-4edb-898e-73aa7305a12c
oapen.relation.isFundedByKnowledge Unlatched
oapen.relation.isbn9781849645898
oapen.collectionKnowledge Unlatched (KU)
oapen.imprintPluto Press
dc.number6882
dc.relationisFundedByb818ba9d-2dd9-4fd7-a364-7f305aef7ee9


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as open access