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dc.contributor.authorD'Ignazio, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Lauren F.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-21T15:12:34Z
dc.date.available2022-02-21T15:12:34Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifierONIX_20220221_9780262358521_104
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/78584
dc.description.abstractA new way of thinking about data science and data ethics that is informed by the ideas of intersectional feminism. Today, data science is a form of power. It has been used to expose injustice, improve health outcomes, and topple governments. But it has also been used to discriminate, police, and surveil. This potential for good, on the one hand, and harm, on the other, makes it essential to ask: Data science by whom? Data science for whom? Data science with whose interests in mind? The narratives around big data and data science are overwhelmingly white, male, and techno-heroic. In Data Feminism, Catherine D'Ignazio and Lauren Klein present a new way of thinking about data science and data ethics—one that is informed by intersectional feminist thought. Illustrating data feminism in action, D'Ignazio and Klein show how challenges to the male/female binary can help challenge other hierarchical (and empirically wrong) classification systems. They explain how, for example, an understanding of emotion can expand our ideas about effective data visualization, and how the concept of invisible labor can expose the significant human efforts required by our automated systems. And they show why the data never, ever “speak for themselves.” Data Feminism offers strategies for data scientists seeking to learn how feminism can help them work toward justice, and for feminists who want to focus their efforts on the growing field of data science. But Data Feminism is about much more than gender. It is about power, about who has it and who doesn't, and about how those differentials of power can be challenged and changed.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStrong Ideas
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFF Social issues & processes::JFFK Feminism & feminist theory
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFS Social groups::JFSJ Gender studies, gender groups::JFSJ5 Gender studies: transsexuals & hermaphroditism
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::P Mathematics & science::PD Science: general issues::PDR Impact of science & technology on society
dc.subject.othernon-binary
dc.subject.othergenderqueer
dc.subject.otherbig data
dc.subject.otherdata science
dc.subject.otherartificial intelligence
dc.subject.otheremancipation
dc.subject.other#MeToo
dc.subject.otherjustice
dc.subject.otherrace
dc.subject.otherclass
dc.subject.othersexuality
dc.subject.otherpower
dc.subject.otherintersectionality
dc.titleData Feminism
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.7551/mitpress/11805.001.0001
oapen.relation.isPublishedByae0cf962-f685-4933-93d1-916defa5123d
oapen.relation.isbn9780262358521
oapen.relation.isbn9780262044004
oapen.imprintThe MIT Press
oapen.pages328
oapen.place.publicationCambridge


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