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dc.contributor.authorTunick, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-11T04:01:51Z
dc.date.available2022-02-11T04:01:51Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.date.submitted2022-02-10T12:47:54Z
dc.identifierONIX_20220210_9781317650379_10
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/52755
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/78190
dc.description.abstractIn an age of smartphones, Facebook and YouTube, privacy may seem to be a norm of the past. This book addresses ethical and legal questions that arise when media technologies are used to give individuals unwanted attention. Drawing from a broad range of cases within the US, UK, Australia, Europe, and elsewhere, Mark Tunick asks whether privacy interests can ever be weightier than society’s interest in free speech and access to information. Taking a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, and drawing on the work of political theorist Jeremy Waldron concerning toleration, the book argues that we can still have a legitimate interest in controlling the extent to which information about us is disseminated. The book begins by exploring why privacy and free speech are valuable, before developing a framework for weighing these conflicting values. By taking up key cases in the US and Europe, and the debate about a ‘right to be forgotten’, Tunick discusses the potential costs of limiting free speech, and points to legal remedies and other ways to develop new social attitudes to privacy in an age of instant information sharing. This book will be of great interest to students of privacy law, legal ethics, internet governance and media law in general.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRoutledge Research in Information Technology and E-Commerce Law
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::L Law::LN Laws of specific jurisdictions and specific areas of law::LND Constitutional and administrative law: general::LNDC Law: Human rights and civil liberties::LNDC2 Privacy lawen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::L Law::LA Jurisprudence and general issues::LAT Legal profession / practice of law: general::LATC Legal ethics and professional conducten_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::L Law::LN Laws of specific jurisdictions and specific areas of law::LNJ Entertainment and media lawen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::L Law::LN Laws of specific jurisdictions and specific areas of law::LNQ IT and Communications law / Postal laws and regulationsen_US
dc.subject.otherfree speech
dc.subject.otherinternet governance
dc.subject.otherlegal ethics
dc.subject.othermedia
dc.subject.otherprivacy
dc.subject.othersocial media
dc.titleBalancing Privacy and Free Speech
dc.title.alternativeUnwanted Attention in the Age of Social Media
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.4324/9781315763132
oapen.relation.isPublishedByfa69b019-f4ee-4979-8d42-c6b6c476b5f0
oapen.relation.isbn9781317650379
oapen.relation.isbn9781138689756
oapen.relation.isbn9781138791053
oapen.relation.isbn9781315763132
oapen.collectionKnowledge Unlatched (KU)
oapen.imprintRoutledge
oapen.pages238
oapen.review.commentsTaylor & Francis open access titles are reviewed as a minimum at proposal stage by at least two external peer reviewers and an internal editor (additional reviews may be sought and additional content reviewed as required).
oapen.peerreviewProposal review
peerreview.review.typeProposal
peerreview.anonymitySingle-anonymised
peerreview.reviewer.typeInternal editor
peerreview.reviewer.typeExternal peer reviewer
peerreview.review.stagePre-publication
peerreview.open.reviewNo
peerreview.publish.responsibilityPublisher
peerreview.idbc80075c-96cc-4740-a9f3-a234bc2598f1
dc.relationisFundedByKnowledge Unlatched
peerreview.titleProposal review


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