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dc.contributor.authorBettoni, Willy
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-21T07:17:13Z
dc.date.available2021-10-21T07:17:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/72459
dc.description.abstractThe idea of progress became increasingly relevant during the 19th century, eventually instigating a paradigm shift. This transformation facilitated not only the emergence of numerous philosophical and literary trends, but also engendered new perspectives in music theory. The composer Franz Liszt was also influenced by the spirit of the epoch. This study’s analysis of his piano compositions from the Sonata in B Minor to the Bagatelle sans tonalité shows how he shaped and adapted his musical language and aesthetic thinking on the basis of what he called the ‘ideal of the time’.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVocesen_US
dc.subject.classificationAVA, JFCen_US
dc.subject.other19. Jahrhundert Aux cyprès de la Villa d'Este S163/3 Berlioz und seine Harold-Symphonie Es muss sein! Fortschritt h-Moll Sonate La lugubre gondola S200/1 late piano works Lisztian Pantheon Nuages gris S199 progress Romanticism Romantik Unstern! – Sinistre S208 Waldesrauschen S145/1 Franz Liszt Klavier Musikästhetiken_US
dc.titleFranz Liszt under the Light of Progressen_US
dc.title.alternativeThe Idea of Mehrdeutigkeit as Aesthetic Paradigm in the Piano Compositions between the B minor Sonata and the Bagatelle sans tonalitéen_US
dc.typebook
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
oapen.abstract.otherlanguageThe idea of progress became increasingly relevant during the 19th century, eventually instigating a paradigm shift. This transformation facilitated not only the emergence of numerous philosophical and literary trends, but also engendered new perspectives in music theory. The composer Franz Liszt was also influenced by the spirit of the epoch. This study’s analysis of his piano compositions from the Sonata in B Minor to the Bagatelle sans tonalité shows how he shaped and adapted his musical language and aesthetic thinking on the basis of what he called the ‘ideal of the time’.en_US
oapen.identifier.doidoi.org/10.5771/9783968218106en_US
oapen.relation.isbn978-3-96821-810-6en_US
oapen.series.numberBand 20en_US
oapen.pages348en_US


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