Notice

This is not the latest version of this item. The latest version can be found at: https://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/71604.2

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDegeling, Jasmin
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-11T08:59:15Z
dc.date.available2021-08-11T08:59:15Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/71604
dc.description.abstractCan art heal? Jasmin Degeling pursues this question via a redefinition of Michel Foucault's concepts of the technologies of the self as well as of care of the self through the lenses of media studies. For that purpose she describes and analyzes the media and aesthetics of Christoph Schlingensief and Elfriede Jelinek as aesthetic therapeutics. The example of the later works of theater, film, and action artist Christoph Schlingensief traces the modern political and aesthetic history of art as a medium of therapeutics, while Elfriede Jelinek's monumental online novel "Neid (Mein Abfall von allem) – Ein Privatroman" experiments with literary writing in virtual spaces and designs an autobiographical novel that rejects any form of literary subject constitution in a feminist way. The study brings contemporary media of care into view as exercises in healing, health, and survival, and connects them to an archaeology of the aesthetic and media history of modern concepts of health and healing.en_US
dc.languageGermanen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanitiesen_US
dc.subject.otherSelbsttechnikenen_US
dc.subject.otherFoucaulten_US
dc.subject.otherSchlingensiefen_US
dc.subject.otherJelineken_US
dc.subject.otherBiopolitiken_US
dc.subject.otherPerformativitäten_US
dc.subject.otherSelbstsorgeen_US
dc.subject.otherSelbstoptimierungen_US
dc.subject.otherAutobiografieen_US
dc.subject.otherMedialitäten_US
dc.subject.otherAvantgardenen_US
dc.subject.otherBeuysen_US
dc.subject.otherMachttheorieen_US
dc.subject.otherWandereren_US
dc.subject.otherKolonialgeschichteen_US
dc.subject.otherSubjektivierungen_US
dc.subject.otherKunstreligionen_US
dc.subject.otherWagneren_US
dc.subject.otherPsychoanalyseen_US
dc.subject.otherVitalismusen_US
dc.subject.otherCyberspaceen_US
dc.titleMedien der Sorge, Techniken des Selbsten_US
dc.title.alternativePraktiken des Über-sich-selbst-Schreibens bei Schlingensief und Jelineken_US
dc.typebook
dc.description.versionillustratoren_US
oapen.abstract.otherlanguageKann Kunst heilen? Dieser Frage geht Jasmin Degeling mittels einer medienwissenschaftlichen Neubestimmung von Michel Foucaults Konzepten der Techniken des Selbst sowie der Sorge um sich nach und analysiert die Medien und Ästhetiken von Christoph Schlingensief und Elfriede Jelinek als ästhetische Therapeutiken. Am Beispiel der späteren Arbeiten des Theater-, Film- und Aktionskünstlers Christoph Schlingensief zeichnet sich die moderne politische und ästhetische Geschichte von Kunst als Medium der Therapeutik ab, während Elfriede Jelineks monumentaler Onlineroman »Neid (Mein Abfall von allem) – Ein Privatroman« mit literarischem Schreiben in virtuellen Räumen experimentiert und einen autobiographischen Roman entwirft, der jeder Form literarischer Subjektkonstitution eine feministische Absage erteilt. Die Studie rückt zeitgenössische Medien der Sorge als Übungen der Heilung, der Gesundheit und des Überlebens in den Blick, und verbindet diese mit einer Archäologie der ästhetischen und medialen Geschichte moderner Konzepte von Gesundheit und Heilung.en_US
oapen.identifier.doi10.14631/978-3-96317-776-7en_US
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy2057a33c-abe5-474a-b271-9acaf528f719
oapen.relation.isbn978-3-96317-238-0en_US
oapen.relation.isbn978-3-96317-776-7en_US
oapen.pages424en_US
oapen.place.publicationMarburgen_US


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
VersionItemDateSummary

*Selected version