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dc.contributor.authorPersson, Mathias
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T08:45:06Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T08:45:06Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.submitted2021-02-12T11:44:01Z
dc.identifierONIX_20210212_9789188909442_7
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/46720
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/63650
dc.description.abstractThe Royal Academy of Sciences was an important organization in eighteenth-century Sweden. It brought together scientists and scholars contributing to a wide spectrum of areas, encompassing nature as well as society. But it also maintained close ties to the elite and the political establishment. The academy formed part of the institutional landscape of power and functioned as a consultive body and an arena for the upper echelons of the Swedish realm. The monograph sheds light on the political and economic outlook of the Royal Academy of Sciences during the period 1739–1792 against the background of its intimate connections to the ruling stratum. Not least the Hat Party, which dominated the Swedish political scene during the Age of Liberty, and the autocratic King Gustav III. The study shows that the members of the academy overall gravitated towards traditional viewpoints and that their conceptualizations of society were substantially affected by their interactions with the power holders. While some fellows offered new ideas in line with an increasing contemporary emphasis on spontaneous societal development and the capability of individuals to act responsibly on their own accord, such notions were by no means prevalent. Moreover, the book demonstrates that neither the academy nor its members constituted a passive tool for the elite and the powers that be. Rather, they engaged in self-promotion by attributing themselves a crucial role in the project of general improvement they envisioned and added to.
dc.languageSwedish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::K Economics, Finance, Business and Management::KC Economics::KCZ Economic historyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::N History and Archaeology::NH Historyen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::J Society and Social Sciences::JB Society and culture: general::JBC Cultural and media studies::JBCC Cultural studies::JBCC9 History of ideasen_US
dc.subject.classificationthema EDItEUR::P Mathematics and Science::PD Science: general issues::PDX History of scienceen_US
dc.subject.otherestate society
dc.subject.otherideology
dc.subject.otherGustav III
dc.subject.otherAge of Liberty
dc.subject.otherRoyal Swedish Academy of Sciences
dc.subject.othereighteenth century
dc.titleDet villrådiga samhället
dc.title.alternativeKungliga Vetenskapsakademiens politiska och ekonomiska ideologi, 1739–1792
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.21525/kriterium.27
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy478079ae-a0b4-4cbd-b1bf-6d3a382e4d76
oapen.pages345
oapen.place.publicationGothenburg
dc.abstractotherlanguageThe Royal Academy of Sciences was an important organization in eighteenth-century Sweden. It brought together scientists and scholars contributing to a wide spectrum of areas, encompassing nature as well as society. But it also maintained close ties to the elite and the political establishment. The academy formed part of the institutional landscape of power and functioned as a consultive body and an arena for the upper echelons of the Swedish realm. The monograph sheds light on the political and economic outlook of the Royal Academy of Sciences during the period 1739–1792 against the background of its intimate connections to the ruling stratum. Not least the Hat Party, which dominated the Swedish political scene during the Age of Liberty, and the autocratic King Gustav III. The study shows that the members of the academy overall gravitated towards traditional viewpoints and that their conceptualizations of society were substantially affected by their interactions with the power holders. While some fellows offered new ideas in line with an increasing contemporary emphasis on spontaneous societal development and the capability of individuals to act responsibly on their own accord, such notions were by no means prevalent. Moreover, the book demonstrates that neither the academy nor its members constituted a passive tool for the elite and the powers that be. Rather, they engaged in self-promotion by attributing themselves a crucial role in the project of general improvement they envisioned and added to.


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