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dc.contributor.authorEmilia Cucinotta*
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T00:03:38Z
dc.date.available2021-02-12T00:03:38Z
dc.date.issued2014*
dc.date.submitted2020-11-10 16:26:00*
dc.identifier50028*
dc.identifier.issn26128020*
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/57102
dc.description.abstractIn “Poetics”, Aristotle accepts history among the possible themes for poetry, on the condition that the poet reaches the universal plane by narrating events which comply with the rules of <i>eikos</i> and of <i>anankaion</i>. With the alteration of Athens’s history in the dialogue “Menexenus” and Solon’s poem on Atlantis in the dialogue “Critias”, Plato precedes Aristotle’s reflection and gives historical narration a central role in the citizens' paideia. In the 5th century, Greek poetry on historical subjects, from Aeschylus’s piece “The Persians” to the poem “The Persians” by Timotheus of Miletus, anticipated and put into practice the themes which Plato and Aristotle would later argument on s theorethical level, namely: the intertwining between the particular of history and the universal of poetry, the models for the <i>mimesis</i>, the audience’s reaction spacing between <i>eleos</i>, <i>phobos</i> and <i>geloion</i>.*
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPremio Tesi di Dottorato*
dc.subjectDF10-951*
dc.subjectDE1-100*
dc.titleProduzione poetica e storia nella prassi e nella teoria greca di et&agrave; classica*
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.36253/978-88-6655-700-5*
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy2ec4474d-93b1-4cfa-b313-9c6019b51b1a*
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameFirenze University Press
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitewww.fupress.com/
oapen.relation.isbn9788866557005*
oapen.pages264*
oapen.volume40*


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