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dc.contributor.authorSabine Sczesny*
dc.contributor.authorAlan Garnham*
dc.contributor.authorJane Oakhill*
dc.contributor.authorLisa von Stockhausen*
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-11T17:24:45Z
dc.date.available2021-02-11T17:24:45Z
dc.date.issued2016*
dc.date.submitted2016-01-19 14:05:46*
dc.identifier18279*
dc.identifier.issn16648714*
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/51394
dc.description.abstractGender inequality remains an issue of high relevance, and controversy, in society. Previous research shows that language contributes to gender inequality in various ways: Gender-related information is transmitted through formal and semantic features of language, such as the grammatical category of gender, through gender-related connotations of role names (e.g., manager, secretary), and through customs of denoting social groups with derogatory vs. neutral names. Both as a formal system and as a means of communication, language passively reflects culture-specific social conditions. In active use it can also be used to express and, potentially, perpetuate those conditions. The questions addressed in the contributions to this Frontiers Special Topic include: • how languages shape the cognitive representations of gender • how features of languages correspond with gender equality in different societies • how language contributes to social behaviour towards the sexes • how gender equality can be promoted through strategies for gender-fair language use These questions are explored both developmentally (across the life span from childhood to old age) and in adults. The contributions present work conducted across a wide range of languages, including some studies that make cross-linguistic comparisons. Among the contributors are both cognitive and social psychologists and linguists, all with an excellent research standing. The studies employ a wide range of empirical methods: from surveys to electro-physiology. The papers in the Special Topic present a wide range of complimentary studies, which will make a substantial contribution to understanding in this important area.*
dc.languageEnglish*
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers Research Topics*
dc.subjectBF1-990*
dc.subjectQ1-390*
dc.subject.otherGender stereotype*
dc.subject.otherGender-fair language*
dc.subject.otherGrammatical Gender*
dc.subject.otherLanguage*
dc.subject.othergender*
dc.subject.otherCognition*
dc.subject.otherGender discrimination*
dc.titleLanguage, Cognition and Gender*
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.3389/978-2-88919-892-4*
oapen.relation.isPublishedBybf5ce210-e72e-4860-ba9b-c305640ff3ae*
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameFrontiers Media SA
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitewww.frontiersin.org
oapen.relation.isbn9782889198924*
oapen.pages188*


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