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dc.contributor.authorHannes Werthner*
dc.contributor.authorFrank van Harmelen*
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-11T16:13:36Z
dc.date.available2021-02-11T16:13:36Z
dc.date.issued2017*
dc.date.submitted2017-07-19 16:43:15*
dc.identifier23071*
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/50213
dc.identifier.pr0*
dc.description.abstractThis volume discusses the prospects and evolution of informatics (or computer science), which has become the operating system of our world, and is today seen as the science of the information society. Its artifacts change the world and its methods have an impact on how we think about and perceive the world. Classical computer science is built on the notion of an “abstract” machine, which can be instantiated by software to any concrete problem-solving machine, changing its behavior in response to external and internal states, allowing for self-reflective and “intelligent” behavior. However, current phenomena such as the Web, cyber physical systems or the Internet of Things show us that we might already have gone beyond this idea, exemplifying a metamorphosis from a stand-alone calculator to the global operating system of our society.*
dc.languageEnglish*
dc.subjectQA75.5-76.95*
dc.subject.otherWomen in computing*
dc.subject.otherResearch ethics*
dc.subject.otherBig data*
dc.subject.otherComputing ethics*
dc.titleInformatics in the Future: Proceedings of the 11th European Computer Science Summit (ECSS 2015), Vienna, October 2015*
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-55735-9*
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy9fa3421d-f917-4153-b9ab-fc337c396b5a*
oapen.relation.isbn9783319557359*
oapen.pages109*


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