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dc.contributor.authorSkuse, Alanna
dc.date.issued2015
dc.date.submitted2020-03-18 13:36:15
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T12:38:51Z
dc.date.submitted2016-03-03 23:55
dc.date.submitted2020-03-18 13:36:15
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T12:38:51Z
dc.identifier1000142
dc.identifierOCN: 1076778632
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/29807
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/38656
dc.description.abstractThe study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine::MB Medicine: general issues::MBX History of medicine
dc.subject.othercancer
dc.subject.otherearly modernity
dc.subject.otherearly modern cancer
dc.subject.otherengland
dc.subject.otherearly modern medical thought
dc.titleChapter 2 Cancer and the Gendered Body
dc.title.alternativeRavenous Natures
dc.typechapter
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy9fa3421d-f917-4153-b9ab-fc337c396b5a
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameSpringer Nature
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitehttp://www.springernature.com/oabooks
oapen.relation.isPartOfBookConstructions of Cancer in Early Modern England
virtual.oapen_relation_isPartOfBook.dc_titleConstructions of Cancer in Early Modern England
oapen.relation.isFundedByWellcome Trust
virtual.oapen_relation_isFundedBy.grantor_nameWellcome Trust
oapen.relation.isFundedByd859fbd3-d884-4090-a0ec-baf821c9abfd
oapen.relation.isbn9781137569196;9781137487537
oapen.collectionWellcome
oapen.imprintPalgrave Macmillan
oapen.pages219
oapen.place.publicationBasingstoke
oapen.grant.number093090
dc.relationisFundedByd859fbd3-d884-4090-a0ec-baf821c9abfd
dc.chapternumber2


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