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dc.contributor.authorCole, Lucinda
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T12:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.submitted2016-05-19 23:55
dc.date.submitted2019-12-04 14:45:37
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:16:52Z
dc.identifier650000
dc.identifier608290
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/32703
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/37937
dc.description.abstract"Lucinda Cole’s Imperfect Creatures offers the first full-length study of the shifting, unstable, but foundational status of “vermin” as creatures and category in the early modern literary, scientific, and political imagination. In the space between theology and an emergent empiricism, Cole’s argument engages a wide historical swath of canonical early modern literary texts—William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Christopher Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta, Abraham Cowley’s The Plagues of Egypt, Thomas Shadwell’s The Virtuoso, the Earl of Rochester’s “A Ramble in St. James’s Park,” and Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Journal of the Plague Year—alongside other nonliterary primary sources and under-examined archival materials from the period, including treatises on animal trials, grain shortages, rabies, and comparative neuroanatomy. As Cole illustrates, human health and demographic problems—notably those of feeding populations periodically stricken by hunger, disease, and famine—were tied to larger questions about food supplies, property laws, national identity, and the theological imperatives that underwrote humankind’s claim to dominion over the animal kingdom. In this context, Cole’s study indicates, so-called “vermin” occupied liminal spaces between subject and object, nature and animal, animal and the devil, the devil and disease—even reason and madness. This verminous discourse formed a foundational category used to carve out humankind’s relationship to an unpredictable, irrational natural world, but it evolved into a form for thinking about not merely animals but anything that threatened the health of the body politic—humans, animals, and even thoughts."
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::D Literature & literary studies::DS Literature: history & criticism::DSB Literary studies: general
dc.subject.otherliterature
dc.subject.othernature
dc.subject.otheranimals
dc.titleImperfect Creatures
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.3998/mpub.4424519
oapen.relation.isPublishedByb7359529-e5f7-4510-a59f-d7dafa1d4d17
oapen.relation.isFundedBy969f21b5-ac00-4517-9de2-44973eec6874
oapen.relation.isbn9780472900626;9780472900633
oapen.collectionKnowledge Unlatched (KU)
oapen.pages240
oapen.place.publicationAnn Arbor
oapen.review.commentsThe proposal was selected by the acquisitions editor who invited a full manuscript. The full manuscript was reviewed by two external readers using a double-blind process. Based on the acquisitions editor recommendation, the external reviews, and their own analysis, the Executive Committee (Editorial Board) of U-M Press approved the project for publication.en_US
peerreview.review.decisionYes
peerreview.review.typeFull text
peerreview.reviewer.typeExternal peer reviewer
peerreview.review.stagePre-publication
peerreview.open.reviewNo
peerreview.publish.responsibilityScientific or Editorial Board
peerreview.idd98bf225-990a-4ac4-acf4-fd7bf0dfb00c
dc.number103491
dc.relationisFundedByb818ba9d-2dd9-4fd7-a364-7f305aef7ee9
dc.redirect650000


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