Show simple item record

dc.contributor.editorNicholson, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.editorDupré, John
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T12:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.date.submitted2018-07-01 23:55
dc.date.submitted2020-01-26 03:15:56
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T12:37:18Z
dc.identifier1000196
dc.identifierOCN: 1051780720
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/29752
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/36523
dc.description.abstractThis collection of essays explores the metaphysical thesis that the living world is not ontologically made up of substantial particles or things, as has often been assumed, but is rather constituted by processes. The biological domain is organized as an interdependent hierarchy of processes, which are stabilized and actively maintained at different timescales. Even entities that intuitively appear to be paradigms of things, such as organisms, are actually better understood as processes. Unlike previous attempts to articulate processual views of biology, which have tended to use Alfred North Whitehead’s panpsychist metaphysics as a foundation, this book takes a naturalistic approach to metaphysics. It submits that the main motivations for replacing an ontology of substances with one of processes are to be looked for in the empirical findings of science. Biology provides compelling reasons for thinking that the living realm is fundamentally dynamic and that the existence of things is always conditional on the existence of processes. The phenomenon of life cries out for theories that prioritize processes over things, and it suggests that the central explanandum of biology is not change but rather stability—or, more precisely, stability attained through constant change. This multicontributor volume brings together philosophers of science and metaphysicians interested in exploring the consequences of a processual philosophy of biology. The contributors draw on an extremely wide range of biological case studies and employ a process perspective to cast new light on a number of traditional philosophical problems such as identity, persistence, and individuality.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::P Mathematics & science::PS Biology, life sciences
dc.subject.otherexplanation
dc.subject.otheridentity
dc.subject.otherindividuality
dc.subject.othermetaphysics of science
dc.subject.otherorganism
dc.subject.otherpersistence
dc.subject.otherphilosophy of biology
dc.subject.otherprocess ontology
dc.subject.othersubstance ontology
dc.subject.othersymbiosis
dc.subject.otherEvolution
dc.titleEverything Flows
dc.title.alternativeTowards a Processual Philosophy of Biology
dc.typebook
oapen.relation.isPublishedBydb4e319f-ca9f-449a-bcf2-37d7c6f885b1
oapen.relation.isFundedBy7292b17b-f01a-4016-94d3-d7fb5ef9fb79
oapen.relation.isFundedByfb214456-da48-4ff7-a1ee-f6407a27f6be
oapen.relation.isbn9780198779636
oapen.collectionEuropean Research Council (ERC)
oapen.pages416
oapen.place.publicationOxford, UK
oapen.grant.number324186
oapen.grant.programFP7
dc.relationisFundedBy7292b17b-f01a-4016-94d3-d7fb5ef9fb79


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

open access
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as open access