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dc.contributor.editorBeier, Katharina
dc.contributor.editorSchnorrer, Silvia
dc.contributor.editorHoppe, Nils
dc.contributor.editorLenk, Christian
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2016-12-31 23:55:55
dc.date.submitted2019-11-27 16:06:17
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:14:05Z
dc.identifier610280
dc.identifierOCN: 808385863
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/32570
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/36510
dc.description.abstractHuman tissue and biobank research is of increasing importance for understanding the causes of widespread diseases and developing effective therapies. However, while the success of biobank research depends on the availability of a large number of samples and the consolidation of collections across country borders is very desirable from the perspective of researchers, the legal and ethical requirements for the procurement, storage and use of human tissue samples are rather heterogeneous across different countries. Moreover, the lack of comprehensive supranational regulation on human tissue and biobanking can be seen as posing a serious threat to transnational biomedical research. Against this background, it was one of the aims of the EU-funded Tiss.EU project (“Evaluation of Legislation and Related Guidelines on the Procurement, Storage and Transfer of Human Tissues and Cells in the European Union – an Evidence-Based Impact Analysis”) to analyse the ethical and legal regulation of human tissue and biobank research across the 27 European Member States plus Switzerland. The results of nine international workshops and three conferences are gathered in this volume. While the country reports evaluate the implementation of ethical and legal guidelines at a national level, point out their strengths and deficits, and, where required, create an evidence base for the revision of said legislation, the conference reports address more general ethical and legal issues in this field. The volume is completed by a final presentation of project’s results.
dc.description.abstractHuman tissue and biobank research is of increasing importance for understanding the causes of widespread diseases and developing effective therapies. However, while the success of biobank research depends on the availability of a large number of samples and the consolidation of collections across country borders is very desirable from the perspective of researchers, the legal and ethical requirements for the procurement, storage and use of human tissue samples are rather heterogeneous across different countries. Moreover, the lack of comprehensive supranational regulation on human tissue and biobanking can be seen as posing a serious threat to transnational biomedical research. Against this background, it was one of the aims of the EU-funded Tiss.EU project (“Evaluation of Legislation and Related Guidelines on the Procurement, Storage and Transfer of Human Tissues and Cells in the European Union – an Evidence-Based Impact Analysis”) to analyse the ethical and legal regulation of human tissue and biobank research across the 27 European Member States plus Switzerland. The results of nine international workshops and three conferences are gathered in this volume. While the country reports evaluate the implementation of ethical and legal guidelines at a national level, point out their strengths and deficits, and, where required, create an evidence base for the revision of said legislation, the conference reports address more general ethical and legal issues in this field. The volume is completed by a final presentation of project’s results.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFM Ethical issues & debates::JFMG Ethical issues: scientific & technological developments
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine::MB Medicine: general issues::MBD Medical profession::MBDC Medical ethics & professional conduct
dc.subject.otherTissue Engeneering
dc.subject.otherBiobank Research
dc.subject.otherLegal Issues
dc.subject.otherEthics
dc.subject.otherEuropean Union
dc.subject.otherInformed consent
dc.subject.otherMedical research
dc.subject.otherTata Institute of Social Sciences
dc.titleThe ethical and legal regulation of human tissue and biobank research in Europe - Proceedings of the Tiss.EU Project
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.17875/gup2011-386
oapen.relation.isPublishedByaf9011e0-03b9-4a5c-9ae6-b9da4898d1b2
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameUniversitätsverlag Göttingen
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitehttp://www.univerlag.uni-goettingen.de/
dc.abstractotherlanguageHuman tissue and biobank research is of increasing importance for understanding the causes of widespread diseases and developing effective therapies. However, while the success of biobank research depends on the availability of a large number of samples and the consolidation of collections across country borders is very desirable from the perspective of researchers, the legal and ethical requirements for the procurement, storage and use of human tissue samples are rather heterogeneous across different countries. Moreover, the lack of comprehensive supranational regulation on human tissue and biobanking can be seen as posing a serious threat to transnational biomedical research. Against this background, it was one of the aims of the EU-funded Tiss.EU project (“Evaluation of Legislation and Related Guidelines on the Procurement, Storage and Transfer of Human Tissues and Cells in the European Union – an Evidence-Based Impact Analysis”) to analyse the ethical and legal regulation of human tissue and biobank research across the 27 European Member States plus Switzerland. The results of nine international workshops and three conferences are gathered in this volume. While the country reports evaluate the implementation of ethical and legal guidelines at a national level, point out their strengths and deficits, and, where required, create an evidence base for the revision of said legislation, the conference reports address more general ethical and legal issues in this field. The volume is completed by a final presentation of project’s results.


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