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dc.contributor.editorStead, Victoria
dc.contributor.editorAltman, Jon
dc.date.available2021-02-10T12:58:18Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019-09-11 13:40:58
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T10:07:47Z
dc.identifier1005380
dc.identifierOCN: 1126148369
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/24731
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/34311
dc.description.abstract"Today, increases of so-called ‘low-skilled’ and temporary labour migrations of Pacific Islanders to Australia occur alongside calls for Indigenous people to ‘orbit’ from remote communities in search of employment opportunities. These trends reflect the persistent neoliberalism within contemporary Australia, as well as the effects of structural dynamics within the global agriculture and resource extractive industries. They also unfold within the context of long and troubled histories of Australian colonialism, and of complexes of race, labour and mobility that reverberate through that history and into the present. The contemporary labour of Pacific Islanders in the horticultural industry has sinister historical echoes in the ‘blackbirding’ of South Sea Islanders to work on sugar plantations in New South Wales and Queensland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as in wider patterns of labour, trade and colonisation across the Pacific region. The antecedents of contemporary Indigenous labour mobility, meanwhile, include forms of unwaged and highly exploitative labouring on government settlements, missions, pastoral stations and in the pearling industry. For both Pacific Islanders and Indigenous people, though, labour mobilities past and present also include agentive and purposeful migrations, reflective of rich cultures and histories of mobility, as well as of forces that compel both movement and immobility. Drawing together historians, anthropologists, sociologists and geographers, this book critically explores experiences of labour mobility by Indigenous peoples and Pacific Islanders, including Māori, within Australia. Locating these new expressions of labour mobility within historical patterns of movement, contributors interrogate the contours and continuities of Australian coloniality in its diverse and interconnected expressions. "
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::1 Geographical Qualifiers::1M Australasia, Oceania & other land areas
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFF Social issues & processes::JFFN Migration, immigration & emigration
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFS Social groups::JFSL Ethnic studies::JFSL9 Indigenous peoples
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JH Sociology & anthropology::JHB Sociology::JHBL Sociology: work & labour
dc.subject.otherIndigenous peoples
dc.subject.otherwork
dc.subject.otherlabour
dc.subject.othermigration
dc.subject.otherAustralia
dc.subject.otherPacific
dc.titleLabour Lines and Colonial Power
dc.title.alternativeIndigenous and Pacific Islander Labour Mobility in Australia
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.22459/LLCP.2019
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy975ba519-3ce2-4517-95bf-b847729fbcf1
oapen.relation.isbn9781760463069
oapen.pages330


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