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dc.contributor.authorJordan, Bénédicte F.
dc.contributor.authorSonveaux, Pierre
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2019-10-04 14:29:40
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:06:57Z
dc.date.submitted2016-08-01 23:55
dc.date.submitted2019-10-04 14:29:40
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:06:57Z
dc.date.submitted2016-12-31 23:55:55
dc.date.submitted2019-10-04 14:29:40
dc.date.submitted2020-04-01T14:06:57Z
dc.identifier612595
dc.identifierOCN: 1030814339
dc.identifierhttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/32342
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/32675
dc.description.abstractHypoxia, a partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) below physiological needs, is a limiting factor affecting the efficiency of radiotherapy. Indeed, the reaction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, produced by water radiolysis) with DNA is readily reversible unless oxygen stabilizes the DNA lesion. While normal tissue oxygenation is around 40 mm Hg, both rodent and human tumors possess regions of tissue oxygenation below 10 mm Hg, at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage (radiobiological hypoxia) (Gray, 1953). Because of this so-called “oxygen enhancement effect”, the radiation dose required to achieve the same biologic effect is about three times higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of normal levels of oxygen (Gray et al., 1953; Horsman & van der Kogel, 2009). Hypoxic tumor cells, which are therefore more resistant to radiotherapy than well oxygenated ones, remain clonogenic and contribute to the therapeutic outcome of fractionated radiotherapy (Rojas et al., 1992).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::P Mathematics & science::PD Science: general issues
dc.subject.othertumor
dc.subject.othersystematic therapies
dc.subject.otherhypoxia
dc.subject.otherradiotherapy
dc.subject.othercancer sensitivity
dc.subject.othertumor
dc.subject.othersystematic therapies
dc.subject.otherhypoxia
dc.subject.otherradiotherapy
dc.subject.othercancer sensitivity
dc.subject.otherBlood
dc.subject.otherHemodynamics
dc.subject.otherMagnetic resonance imaging
dc.subject.otherNeoplasm
dc.subject.otherOxygen
dc.subject.otherPerfusion
dc.subject.otherRadiation therapy
dc.subject.otherVasodilation
dc.titleChapter 13 Targeting Tumor Perfusion and Oxygenation Modulates Hypoxia and Cancer Sensitivity to Radiotherapy and Systemic Therapies
dc.typechapter
oapen.identifier.doi10.5772/23332
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy035ecc65-6737-43cf-a13a-6bdf67ce01f4
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameInTechOpen
oapen.relation.isPartOfBookAdvances in Cancer Therapy
virtual.oapen_relation_isPartOfBook.dc_titleAdvances in Cancer Therapy
oapen.relation.isFundedByFP7 Ideas: European Research Council
virtual.oapen_relation_isFundedBy.grantor_nameFP7 Ideas: European Research Council
oapen.relation.isFundedBy7292b17b-f01a-4016-94d3-d7fb5ef9fb79
oapen.collectionEuropean Research Council (ERC)
oapen.grant.number243188
oapen.grant.programFP7
dc.relationisFundedBy7292b17b-f01a-4016-94d3-d7fb5ef9fb79
dc.chapternumber1


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