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dc.contributor.authorSablin, Ivan
dc.contributor.authorBadagarov, Jargal
dc.contributor.authorSodnomova, Irina
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T13:37:55Z
dc.date.available2021-02-10T13:37:55Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifierhttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/46057
dc.identifier51296*
dc.identifier.urihttps://directory.doabooks.org/handle/20.500.12854/30048
dc.description.abstractThe political system of early socialist-era Mongolia, established by the first Constitution in 1924, can be interpreted as a vernacular version of the Soviet system, in which the formally supreme representative body, the State Great Khural (“assembly”), was sidelined by the standing Presidium of the Small Khural and the Cabinet, and eclipsed by the non-constitutional party authorities. The establishment of this sham and nominal parliamentary system was a consequence of the Bolshevik new imperialism, the inclusion of the Mongolian People’s Republic into the informal Soviet empire, which occurred through both military control and structural adjustments under the supervision of the Communist International. The 1924 Mongolian Constitution, however, was not a mere copy of its Soviet 1918 and 1924 counterparts but a transimperial document. In its text and especially in the history of its making, it reflected the entangled imperial transformations of the Russian and Qing empires and featured both indigenous (Khalkha and Buryad-Mongol) agency and vernacular political discourses. Khural existed as a non-representative yet deliberative consultative assembly in 1914–1919, while Tsebeen Jamtsarano attempted to make a Mongolian khural one of the many world parliaments, even though his draft constitution was affected by the practices of revolutionary Russia.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFS Social groups::JFSL Ethnic studies::JFSL3 Black & Asian studies
dc.subject.otherculture, identity, Marzluf, Mongolia, nation, P, Phillip, post, post-socialist, Simon, socialist, Wickhamsmith
dc.titleChapter 2 Khural Democracy
dc.title.alternativeImperial Transformations and the Making of the First Mongolian Constitution, 1911–1924
dc.typechapter
oapen.relation.isPublishedByfa69b019-f4ee-4979-8d42-c6b6c476b5f0
oapen.relation.isPartOfBook8162d42d-324e-4a34-bcf2-d44b2d759305
oapen.relation.isFundedBy51ab353e-7e24-4831-b528-d54333439d63
oapen.relation.isFundedBy148d4ce5-041f-41b9-bc26-2386a20c3555
oapen.relation.isbn9780367350574
oapen.relation.isbn9780367695033
oapen.imprintRoutledge
oapen.pages30
dc.dateSubmitted2021-01-12T12:41:40Z
dc.relationisFundedBy51ab353e-7e24-4831-b528-d54333439d63


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